Upswing

I’m happy to report that I’m feeling much better since my last post. Gosh it was months ago, I always mean to sit down and write a post, but I end up spending 5 hours on Pinterest instead. Not even kidding, I’m a major Pinterest addict, it sucks the life right out of me.

Anyway, right after my last post I got my hair chopped to a pixie. It was the next day actually, I couldn’t stand the asymmetrical thing, it looked awful. The pixie looks 100 times better, but to be honest, I still have mixed feelings about it.

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I’ve had a million compliments on it, from friends, family, coworkers, customers at work, and even random strangers. I still miss my long hair though, and I don’t like the way short hair looks. Every time I see a girl walk by with waist length (or longer) hair, I instantly feel jealous.

However, I admit that chopping my hair has significantly helped my migraines. I’m still having them on a daily basis, but they tend to be less painful! Sometimes lately I don’t feel any pain at all with my migraines, I only have the secondary symptoms. (Secondary symptoms are things like dizziness, nausea/vomiting, light and sound sensitivity, auras, ect.) My migraines can still be severe, obviously, but at least they are not painful.

What I love most about having a pixie though, is that it is low maintenance. At the most I might straighten my bangs and thrown in a bobby pin before I leave the house, but that’s it. I don’t have to waste precious energy on my hair when I’m not feeling well. I used to easily spend an hour or more on my hair everyday, just trying to find the least painful way to put it up… now the most I might spend 3 or 4 minutes on my hair in the morning.

My blackouts and tachycardia are much better too… (not because I cut my hair, don’t be silly), but I started swimming again to build muscle like I used to do in physical therapy. My plan was to take some swim classes at our local community center so that I could be closely supervised by an instructor in case something happened. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any instructors that were willing to deal with my crazy work schedule though. So I just went to the pool on my own, and got started.

It was REALLY difficult at first. The hardest part was just trying to breath. At first I had to keep my head above water at all times, because I was breathing so hard from the tachycardia. I couldn’t put my face in the water and rotary breath like most swimmers do. In fact I still struggle to rotary breath, even now that I’m feeling much better, but least I can do it for a couple of laps!

The most effective swim exercise (in my opinion) for POTS, is just using a kick board. By holding onto the kick board, it keeps your head above water at all times so you can breath, and all the kicking as you swim back and forth helps to build serious muscle in the lower body. (For those who don’t know, building muscle, especially in the lower body, is very effective in controlling POTS. As your body builds muscle, it also builds new blood vessels and nerves which improve circulation and help prevent the blood from rushing to your feet when you stand up.) Not to mention, it makes your legs and butt look good! (Just saying).

After about a month of swimming 2-3 times a week, my blackouts stopped and my tachycardia and shortness of breath are barely noticeable. I’ve been able to go back off the Propranolol, start using ladders again at work, and start horseback riding again!

Anyone else tried swimming for POTS? Lemme know how it worked for you!

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